CIGI-Ipsos Global Survey on Internet Security and Trust - Centre for International Governance Innovation 2016

CIGI-Ipsos Global Survey on Internet Security and Trust - Centre for International Governance Innovation 2016

The 2016 CIGI-Ipsos Global Survey on Internet Security and Trust, undertaken by the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) and conducted by global research company Ipsos, reached 24,143 Internet users in 24 countries, and was carried out between November 20, 2015 and December 4, 2015.

The countries included: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Egypt, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Poland, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden, Tunisia, Turkey and the United States.

The global Survey was developed to help support the work of the Global Commission on Internet Governance (GCIG). The GCIC, an initiative by CIGI and Chatham House, was established to articulate and advance a strategic vision for the future of Internet governance.

The Dark Net

The survey found that:

Seven in ten global citizens say the “dark net” should be shut down, while three in ten disagree, believing it should continue to exist. The question remains: why do so many global citizens believe the dark net should continue to exist, if it embodies the seedy underbelly of the Internet? The answer lies in the desire of global citizens to preserve the anonymity and benefits that are also a central part of the dark net.

  • 71% of global citizens agree the dark net should be shut down
  • 46% of global citizens trust that their activities on the Internet are not being censored
  • 38% of global citizens trust that their activities on the Internet are not being monitored
  • Only six in ten users say that government assurances that they are not being censored (59%) or monitored (58%) would make them trust the Internet more.

Read the news release here.

Privacy vs National Security

The survey found that:

Most global citizens favour enabling law enforcement to access private online conversations if they have valid national security reasons to do so, or if they are investigating an individual suspected of committing a crime. The survey also found that a majority of respondents do not want companies to develop technologies that would undermine law enforcement’s ability to access much needed data.

  • 70% of global citizens agree that law enforcement agencies should have a right to access the content of their citizens’ online communications for valid national security reasons, including 69% of Americans and 65% of Canadians who agree
  • 85% of global citizens agree that when someone is suspected of a crime governments should be able to find out who their suspects communicated with online, including 80% of Americans who agree
  • 63% of global citizens agree that companies should not develop technologies that prevent law enforcement from accessing the content of an individual's online conversations
  • Sixty percent of Americans and 57% of Canadians are most likely to agree with this statement.

Read the news release here.

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